Phoenix-based photographer, Ernie Button, has been creating photos of the patterns formed after letting a drop or two of whiskey coat and dry in the bottom of a glass.

“The idea for this project occurred while putting a used Scotch glass into the dishwasher.  I noted a film on the bottom of a glass and when I inspected closer, I noted these fine, lacey lines filling the bottom.  What I found through some experimentation is that these patterns and images that you see can be created with the small amount of Single Malt Scotch left in a glass after most of it has been consumed.  The alcohol dries and leaves the sediment in various patterns.  It’s a little like snowflakes in that every time the Scotch dries, the glass yields different patterns and results.  I have used different color lights to add ‘life’ to the bottom of the glass, creating the illusion of landscape, terrestrial or extraterrestrial.” — Ernie Button

The resulting radial patterns occur as the whiskey evaporates. “At high ethanol concentrations, the contact line recedes and draws groups of particles along with it that are then deposited in ring-shaped patterns“, LiveScience writes.

The Macallan 150
The Macallan 150
Gengoyne 116
Gengoyne 116
Glengoyne 117
Glengoyne 117
Glenfiddich 115
Glenfiddich 115
The Balvenie 125
The Balvenie 125
Aberlour 106
Aberlour 106

View more of Button’s photography.

H/t I Fucking Love Science

Related Articles: